Blue Heron Review: Nurturing Hope

When Editor Cristina Norcross reopened Blue Heron Review for a special bonus issue to share writing of hope generated through an arduous pandemic, I jumped at the opportunity to share and was happy to learn that my poem, “In the Cauldron,” was included. I first published with Blue Heron Review in 2017, and was later Blue Heron Review’s Featured Author in February 2019. I’ve always appreciated this journal for its publication of thoughtful writing and art, and the re-open for a bonus issue is indeed a bonus!

Christina says it best in her letter:

Dear Reader,

It is such a great pleasure to share this issue with you!  My goal in opening up Blue Heron Review again for a special bonus issue was to provide writers and readers a chance to surround themselves with the energy of hope and promise after this long pandemic year.  You will find exquisite, fine art photography and beautiful poetry to nurture the soul.  These poems reflect the different experiences people felt moved to share.  Through recognizing your own stories of struggle, resilience, and human connection, I hope that the many tomorrows of 2021 seem a bit brighter. 

With kind thoughts,

Cristina M. R. Norcross, Founding Editor
Blue Heron Review

Perfect for Sunday morning reading, enjoy this issue. It was compiled with good energy and intention.

(Cover art credit: Kathleen Gunton)

Mason Street, Newark Library Literary Journal

I feel such a kinship with library systems, especially those in small towns. Often a hub, they have the ability to bring together, and in many cases, create community. When Bruce and I traveled Canada for many summers, our first stop was often the local library. It wasn’t just to borrow Wi-Fi to contact home, but also check out local happenings, what types of resources were offered, what folks were reading in their neck of the woods. In fact, I collected a good 7-10 library cards from small town libraries across Canada, from British Columbia to Newfoundland. I may never return to these destinations, but I like to think that my card-carrying membership added to their collective reader base, somehow.

Last fall, I sent some poetry to Mason Street, the Newark Library Literary Journal. The Newark Library is located in Newark, New York, and of course my curiosity about such an offering through a library system got the best of me and I had to learn more about this particular library. Like so many libraries I’ve had the joy of experiencing, the Newark Library is really no different. Community within community.

Mason Street’s Editor and Founder, Celeste Schantz selected my poem “Troubadour” for the winter issue and “Faithful” for the spring. Both poems are in good company, and I was especially delighted, no, fangirl delighted, to see that poet Marge Piercy headlines the spring issue with “My Library Memories.” Swoon! If you haven’t read her work, you should. The first collection of hers that I savored is titled The Moon Is Always Female, a must-read. This is her 7th collection of writing. Organized into two sections, the first is categorized as “amusingly elegiac to the erotic, the classical to the funny (Amazon).” The second section is lunar in nature. It consists of a series of 15 poems for “a calendar based on lunar rather than solar divisions” (Amazon).

I’m really thankful that both “Troubadour” and “Faithful” found a home in the pages of a literary journal of a thriving library far away from home. Should you get the chance, read both issues. Visit the archives. But most importantly, keep writing and sharing our work with the world.

Humble Pie

I am incredibly happy to have a poem appear in the pages of Humble Pie’s Volume XVII. The poem is titled “Greens & Lanterns,” composed in the fall when most days felt like I was grabbing at straws to make technology and school days work. It was quite a scramble and poetry offered a sweet escape.

And when finally spring rolled around, it was a warm celebration of writers and artists who celebrated the launch of this issue via Zoom on a May evening. Thank you to Caroline Goodwin, poet extraordinaire, who oversees the work that goes into such a quality journal.